Residency Program

Residency Program

Marina Abramović will mentor 12 Australian performance practitioners throughout our 30th Kaldor Public Art Project, Marina Abramović: In Residence. Throughout this  intensive Artists Residency Program, these Artists will explore the Marina Abramović Method and develop their own performative practice through research, workshops, discussion and debate.

Join the Residents upstairs at Pier 2/3 throughout the Project (24 June – 5 July, 2015) to observe and participate in the development of performance works, join discussions over a coffee with the artists, catch up on the history of performance art in our tailor made library and explore each Resident’s creative practice through our stimulating series of public programs.

Join us from 5pm to 7pm each day for Evenings in Residence an informal, stimulating and at times unpredictable, series of screenings and events, presented by the 12 participating Artists.

Return to this webpage to explore the daily video, photographic and written reflections by the Artists and Co-curators as they progress through the program.

The Australian Artists Residency Program for Marina Abramovic: In Residence is curated by Sophie O’Brien with Emma Pike.

Photograph © 2014 Marco Anelli/Serpentine Galleries

 

Talks & EVENTS Find the complete listing of talks and events for Marina Abramović: In Residence, including the Artists' Residency Program here.
Download the full guide for the Residency and Public Program here. 


PROGRAM - SUNDAY 5 JULY
Today the Residency Artists are performing upstairs at Pier 2/3 from 12-5pm.
Sunday 5 July, 2015
Experiments

Saturday 4 July, 2015
Program - Saturday 4 July
Today the Residency Artists are performing upstairs at Pier 2/3 from 12-5pm.
Saturday 4 July, 2015
DESIRE
Experimenting with stories of desire
Friday 3 July, 2015
BRB
Rehearsal of zin's work 'BRB' which will be performed this Saturday, 4 July 5-7pm.
Friday 3 July, 2015
Crash Mat
Crash Mat Experiment #3
Friday 3 July, 2015
STRIKE DAY

Thursday 2 July, 2015
A Social Service
NIcola Gunn workshops her play 'A Social Service' with the public
Wedneday 1 July, 2015
10 minute reflection
Doing nothing until something happens. Each morning over a 1O minute period, in the more or less only time that I feel that I have to myself all day, I attempt to record some thoughts. No Profundities.
Friday 3 July, 2015
CURATOR
Frances workshops a new work 'Curator'. Co-Curator of the Artists Residency program Emma Pike, had to care for Frances for a period of 12-hours.
Thursday 2 July, 2015
SORRY
Roslyn Helper form 'zin' develops a new work.
Thursday 2 July, 2015
tucked up in bed
It gets cold at the Pier
Thursday 2 July, 2015
CRASH MAT
Crash mat experiment #2
Thursay 2 July, 2015
10 minute reflection
Doing nothing until something happens. Each morning over a 1O minute period, in the more or less only time that I feel that I have to myself all day, I attempt to record some thoughts. No Profundities.
Thursday July 2, 2015
crash mat
Crash mat experiment #1
Wednesday 1 July, 2015
10 minute reflection
Doing nothing until something happens. Each morning over a 1O minute period, in the more or less only time that I feel that I have to myself all day, I attempt to record some thoughts. No Profundities.
Wednesday 1 July, 2015
CONVERSATIONS
Notes from todays discussions
Wednesday 1 July, 2015
CONVERSATIONS
Notes from todays discussions
Tuesday 30 June, 2015
10 minute reflection
Doing nothing until something happens.
Each morning over a 1O minute period, in the more or less only time that I feel that I have to myself all day, I attempt to record some thoughts. No Profundities.
Tuesday 30 June, 2015
A VERY CASUAL LEAN
Sarah Rodigari's experiment today
Monday 29 June, 2015
ONE ON ONE
Marina and the Artists workshopping ideas today
Monday 29 June, 2015
Group Work - PT 3
Marina workshops ideas with the Residents
Monday 29 June, 2015
Group work - PT 2
Marina workshops ideas with the Residents
Monday 29 June, 2015
Group work - PT 1
Marina workshops ideas with the Residents
Monday 29 June, 2015
10 minute reflection
Doing nothing until something happens.


Each morning over a 1O minute period, in the more or less only time that I feel that I have to myself all day, I attempt to record some thoughts. No Profundities.
Monday 29 June, 2015
One on One

Monday 29 June, 2015
Script
This is the first iteration of a script for zin's new work that explores surfing the internet as a performative act. They will be presenting the work on Saturday for the public program.
June 29, 2015
Conversations
Notes from todays discussions
Friday, 26 June 2015
RICE COUNT
6.5 hours separating and counting rice and lentils
Friday 26 June, 2015
Desk Space

June 26, 2015
Day 1
Our Residency Artists move into Pier 2/3
Wednesday 24 June, 2014
Participation
Roslyn and Harriet deconstruct their use of participation in their practice.
Thursday 25 June, 2015
'Prosumer'
Art partnership 'zin' discuss the concept of a 'prosumer' as they prepare for the Residency Program.
Thursday 11 June, 2015
Radical Vulnerability
As a performer I owe a debt to Abramovic and other artists of her generation as pioneers of the form.
Thursday May 14, 2015
Expectations
My approach to making work includes responding to the project brief in the site where the work is presented. In short this means I won’t know what will happen until I arrive at Pier 2-3. The artwork will only be realised in the process of its making, live in the present moment and in relation to you, the viewer.
Thursday 14 May, 2015
The Residency Program
Introducing artists Lottie Consalvo, George Khut and Frances Barrett.
Friday 22 May, 2015

Aunty Julie Freeman

Aunty Julie Freeman, as a Gorawarl Jerrawongarla woman is a traditional owner for south Sydney and the south coast of New South Wales. Aunty Julie is a recognised artist, cultural leader and story teller. As a senior cultural knowledge holder Aunty Julie tells important creation narratives for the local environment, firmly placing the region within a Indigenous cultural framework, reminding audiences of traditional knowledge system of the region.

Bruce Pascoe

Bruce Pascoe is an award-winning Australian writer, editor and anthologist whose books include Shark, Ruby-eyed Coucal, Ocean, Earth and Nightjar. Bruce has also written a number of non- fiction works, most recently Dark Emu, Convincing Ground, a Wathaurong language dictionary and The Little Red, Yellow, Black Book. His children’s novels include The Chainsaw File (Oxford, 2011), and Fog, a dox (Magabala, 2012), which won the Prime Minister’s Award for Young Adult Literature in 2013. In 2016, Pascoe won two NSW Premier's Literature Awards including Book of The Year and the Indigenous Writer's Prize. 

 


Christian Thompson

Christian Thompson is an Australian born, London-based photographic, conceptual and performance artist who’s work explores notions of identity, cultural hybridity and history. Formally trained as a sculptor, Thompson’s multidisciplinary practice engages mediums such as photography, video, sculpture, performance and sound. His work is primarily focuses on the performative exploration of identity, sexuality, gender, race, ritual and memory. In his performances and photographic works he inhabits a range of personas achieved through handcrafted costumes and carefully orchestrated poses and backdrops and is known for his evocative photographic self portraits and video works.

In 2010 Thompson made history when he was awarded the Inaugural Charlie Perkins Scholarship and became the first Aboriginal Australian to be admitted into the University of Oxford in its 900-year history. He holds a Doctorate of Philosophy (Fine Art), Trinity College, University of Oxford, Britain, Master of Theatre, Amsterdam School of Arts, Das Arts, The Netherlands, Masters of Fine Art (Sculpture) RMIT University and Honours (Sculpture) RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia and a Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland.

Photo: Courtesy the Artist

Clark Beaumont

Clark Beaumont is the Brisbane-based collaborative duo Nicole Beaumont and Sarah Clark. Through both live and mediated performance works they investigate ideas and constructs around identity, female subjectivity, intimacy and interpersonal relationships. Clark Beaumont are the subjects for their work and their collaboration means exploring the social and physical dynamics of working together to create artwork.

Clark Beaumont formed in 2010 at QUT, Brisbane whilst completing their Bachelor Degrees in Fine Arts. In 2013, Clark Beaumont were selected as the 13th addition to the 27th Kaldor Public Art Project, 13 Rooms, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Klaus Biesenbach. In 2014, Clark Beaumont held their first solo exhibition at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery and were selected by QAGOMA as the 2014 recipients of the Melville Haysom Memorial Art Scholarship. They also received Highly Commended at the Churchie National Emerging Art Prize and this year will exhibit in ‘GOMA Q: Queensland Contemporary Art’ at The Gallery of Modern Art.

During the residency program, Clark Beaumont intend to gain new perspectives and knowledge of contemporary live performance practice. Through temporarily opening up their normally insular collaborative process to include Marina Abramović and the other artists in residence, the duo will engage with new concepts, techniques and approaches to making live work. They will extend upon their research into the constructs of performance, and the complex dynamic between viewer and performer.

Above right: Clark Beaumont, Coexisting, 2013 performed for Kaldor Public Art Project 27: 13 Rooms, 2013, curated by Klaus Biesenbach and Hans Ulrich Obrist. Photo: Kaldor Public Art Projects/Jamie North

Daniel von Sturmer

Born 1972 Auckland, New Zealand; lives and works in Melbourne.

Daniel von Sturmer uses video to underline the “ordinary” in our lives and to comment on the artistic process. He explores how complex meaning can be constructed from simple events and actions which focus on everyday objects and the unexpected. His works are characterised by the use of ordinary objects filmed using simple backgrounds and without digital enhancement. He uses deceptively common materials ranging from balls of string and BLU TAK to rolls of masking tape and paper clips. These works toy with our expectations and often surprise us in the way he gives life to inanimate objects or makes materials behave in unexpected ways.

Von Sturmer has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally including Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio; Site Gallery, Sheffield, UK; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne; Gothenburg Museum of Art, Sweden; Hamburger Bahnhof Museum, Berlin; Auckland Art Gallery; Kunsthaus, Hamburg; and CCNOA, Brussels. He has participated in numerous international festivals, screenings and biennales including the Lyon Biennale (2013), AVIA Video Art Festival, Sweden (2012), Perth International Arts Festival (2009), DenHaag Sculptuur (2007), Anne Landa Award (2006), Biennale of Sydney (2002, 2004). In 2007 he represented Australia at the 52nd Venice Biennale.

All of the elements…add up to propositions about the viewer’s viewing - and how meaning is formed by an encounter where moving images unfold between and beside physical objects made from both found and sculptural materials. They are intended to pose questions about the nature of art, the embodiment of time, and how context shapes the apparent meaning and the experience of the work.
- Daniel von Sturmer

David Rosetzsky

Born 1970, Melbourne, lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

David Rosetzy works in both photography and video. His work explores the disjunction between appearance and reality; between how others see us and how we see ourselves; between public projection and private experience. In the video work Nothing like this (2007), a group of young men and women take a holiday together. We watch voyeuristically as their holiday unfolds in a series of vignettes set in idealised locations, resembling those found in lifestyle magazines.

I often use specific advertisements, TV shows and fashion photographs as reference material for my work. It’s important that my work reflects these sources as I am concerned with how this type of visual language affects the way we live and how we see ourselves in relation to one another…I’m interested in how people negotiate the space that exists between the ideal and the real in their everyday lives.
- David Rosetzky, quoted in Andrew Frost ‘Trouble in Paradise’ Australian Art Collector, issue 28, April-June 2004

Rosetzky’s work has been exhibited widely throughout Australia and internationally, including solo and group exhibitions at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2002), Hamburger Bahnhof (2003), Le Case d’Arte Vetrina, Milan (2007), International Centre for Photography, New York, USA (2009), Seoul Art Museum, Seoul (2011), Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Tokyo (2011), Art Gallery of New South Wales (2013) and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (2014). His 2013-2014 solo exhibition True Self toured through regional galleries and cultural centres across Australia. In 2014, he was co-commissioned by the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne, and Carriageworks, Sydney to create the video installation Gaps.His work is held in public art gallery collections across Australia.He is represented by Sutton Gallery, Melbourne.

 


Dr Christine Evans

Dr. Christine Evans is a Wiradjuri woman with connection to the Mudgee region of NSW. Her research has been focused on both the redesigning of higher education curriculum and in the evaluation of school-based teaching and learning practices with particular regard to the representation of the knowledge and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Christine is currently Chief Education Officer, Aboriginal Education, Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards (BOSTES) NSW. For several years Christine worked as a secondary visual arts teacher and then as a senior lecturer working in teacher education programs at the University of Technology Sydney in the areas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education and Visual Arts education. She holds a number of positions on boards including the MCA Indigenous Advisory Group and the NSW State Library Indigenous Advisory Board.

 


Dr Clint Bracknell

As both a contemporary musician and music researcher, Dr Clint Bracknell coordinates the Bachelor of Music Studies (Contemporary Music Practice) at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music (University of Sydney) and studies the links between Aboriginal Australian song and languages, emerging technologies and Indigenous creative futures. His Aboriginal family from the south coast of Western Australia use the term ‘Wirlomin Noongar’ to refer to their clan and his PhD research focused on the aesthetics and sustainability of Noongar song. He produces music for a range of media and performance platforms and was nominated for ‘Best Original Score’ in the 2012 Helpmann Awards. Dr Bracknell has received secondary and tertiary teaching awards, was the recipient of the State Library of Western Australia’s J.S. Battye Memorial Fellowship in 2013 and contributed to the United Nations International Expert Group Meeting on Indigenous Languages in 2016.

 


Dr Stan Grant Snr AM

Dr Stan Grant Snr AM, is a Wiradjuri Elder and an expert in the Wiradjuri language. He has spent most with Dr John Rudder and has produced numerous publications, recordings and teaching resources. In 2006 this work was recognised with the Deadly Award of Outstanding Achievement in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education, and in 2013 he was granted an Honorary Doctorate of Letters by Charles Sturt University in recognition of his work to Indigenous communities. 

Frances Barrett

Frances Barrett is a Sydney-based artist whose practice explores performance through symbolic and direct action. Barrett’s work is informed by queer and feminist methodologies and recent projects have taken the form of body-based live actions, endurance performance and sonic experimentation. Since 2005 Barrett has worked as part of the performance and video collective Brown Council whose work interrogates modes of collaboration and the history of feminist art practices. From 2009-13 Barrett was Co-Director of Serial Space, a space that was dedicated to supporting and presenting live and experimental art forms. In 2014, she presented work as part of Day for Night at Performance Space (Sydney), SafARI (Sydney), Tiny Stadiums Festival (Sydney) and Restaging Restaging at Alaska (Sydney). In 2015 she will be performing work at 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (Sydney) and Australian Experimental Art Foundation (Adelaide), while also curating Haunting at Firstdraft (Sydney). She is currently Curator of Contemporary Performance at Campbelltown Arts Centre and host of FBI Radio arts show, Canvas.

The Residency Program will enable Frances to undertake an intensive period of research and development towards a new body of work. Throughout the 12-days Frances will look at the intersections between body-based practice, sound practice, and recorded actions. As part of her research she will embark on a series of performative experiments, group conversations, interviews, and listening exercises to explore how live performance can be translated into a sonic experience. Frances intends to respond to the context and environment of the Kaldor Residency Program and to apply the skills taught by Marina Abramovic to the development of this new body of work.

Above right: Frances Barrett, The 12-Hour Revolution, live performance, 12hr duration, documentation of performance at Sydney Guild, Sydney. Photo: Alex Wisser

 

 


Gary Warner

Gary Warner is a self-taught artist, art worker and digital media producer, and has worked in the cultural sector for almost 40 years. He has developed programs and produced multimedia platforms for the Australian Film Commission, the Museum of Sydney, the Melbourne Museum campus and was Chair of the Coordinating Committee and Co-Curator of the Third International Symposium on Electronic Art in Sydney in 1992. He established CDP Media and has worked as a creative director and collaborator on a wide variety of cultural projects in museums, art galleries, visitor centres and botanic gardens across Australia.

 


George (Poonkhin) Khut

George (Poonkhin) Khut is an Australian artist and academic at UNSW Art and Design, working across the fields of electronic and participatory art, interaction design and health. For the past 12 years he has been working with biofeedback technologies, creating intimate, body-focussed participatory artworks, that re-frame our experiences and representations of embodiment, presentness and body-mind interactions. Khut works with biofeedback technologies to challenge popular assumptions about the impact of digital technologies on the body. He challenges the idea that technology minimises our ability to pay attention and uses technology instead to slow down and focus our attention into our body, the bodies of others, and the psycho-physiological dimensions of our being.

In 2012 Khut was awarded the Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, National New Media Art Award, for his heart rate controlled interactive artwork Distillery: Waveforming – a work developed as part of his residency at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead (Sydney), where he collaborated with Brain Injury Specialist Dr Angela Morrow on a heart rate controlled application for use with children undergoing painful procedures. Recent exhibitions include The Heart Library Project, exhibited this year in the Group Therapy group exhibition at FACT (Liverpool, U.K.), and MoCA Taipei (Taiwan, 2012), ThetaLab presented at ISEA2013 (Sydney), and Cardiomorphologies presented at the Biennale of Electronic Arts Perth, 2007, and InBetweenTime 2006, at Arnolfini (U.K.).

For the residency program, Khut will be developing a new work combining brainwave-controlled sound-designs, with audience participation and story-sharing, working with experiences of stillness and presentness frequently reported by people undergoing Alpha neurofeedback training, and the experiential narratives and visualisations that arise from these interactions. Khut’s interest here is in the potential of neurofeedback technologies to facilitate experiences of presentness and stillness, the artistic implications for working with (interactive) sound in this way, and what it can mean for people when they observe that they can voluntarily focus and sustain their attention and presence in this way.

Above right: George Poonkhin Khut and James Brown, “AlphaLab”/“ThetaLab”, creative neurofeedback participatory event, 2013. Photo: James P Brown

 

Grant Stevens

Born 1980, Brisbane, lives and works in Sydney, Australia.

Grant Stevens is an Australian artist, working predominantly with video, as well as photography, drawing, sculpture and installation. His art practice explores how the verbal and non-verbal ‘languages’ of popular screen culture interface with contemporary subjectivity.

I think that language is something that you can never control. Exactly what I want to say is always out of grasp, or even when I think I've got it right it gets misinterpreted. It's also a really fundamental thing that we use. It's so important to what we do every day in our lives as humans. There's so much potential in thinking about or re-thinking what it means to be using language all the time.
- Grant Stevens, quoted in Tom Cardy, ‘When words collide,’ The Dominion Post, 1 July 2014

He has held numerous solo exhibitions in Australia, as well as in New Zealand, Italy and the United States. His work has been included in numerous group exhibitions at museums and galleries, both nationally and internationally. In 2007, Stevens received his PhD from the Queensland University of Technology.

 


Grant Stevens

Born 1980, Brisbane; lives and works in Brisbane.

Grant Stevens is an Australian artist, working predominantly with video, as well as photography, drawing, sculpture and installation. His art practice explores how the verbal and non-verbal ‘languages’ of popular screen culture interface with contemporary subjectivity. He has held numerous solo exhibitions in Australia, as well as in New Zealand, Italy and the United States. His work has been included in numerous group exhibitions at museums and galleries, both nationally and internationally. In 2007, Stevens received his PhD from the Queensland University of Technology.

I think that language is something that you can never control. Exactly what I want to say is always out of grasp, or even when I think I've got it right it gets misinterpreted. It's also a really fundamental thing that we use. It's so important to what we do every day in our lives as humans. There's so much potential in thinking about or re-thinking what it means to be using language all the time.
- Grant Stevens, quoted in Tom Cardy, ‘When words collide,’ The Dominion Post, 1 July 2014

Jess MacNeil

Born 1977, Nova Scotia, Canada, lives and works in London, UK.

Jess MacNeil’s practice encompasses painting, installation, video and photography, exploring issues of time and memory and the relationship between humans and the environment. As viewers we anticipate layers of visual information being added to what we watch. When meaning is lacking or unclear in a video image, we expect clarification and this is usually in the form of more rather than less visual information. In her video works Jess MacNeil employs a deceptively simple process that challenges this expectation.

My subject isn’t people or the environment, but the point where they meet. I find the relationships between things fascinating. I’m interested in the way the spaces we occupy are part of us, and us of them. The traditional figure-ground relationship reinforces a way of seeing where things are separate from one another. It doesn’t ring true to me.
- Jess MacNeil, in an interview with Christine Morrow, Australian Art Collector (Issue 60, April – June 2012)

MacNeil has exhibited widely internationally and within Australia. Her work was presented at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, in 2009. She has received a number of prestigious scholarships and awards, including the 2009 Primavera Veolia Acquisitive Award. Her work is held in public collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the Australia Council for the Arts as well as numerous Australian and international private collections. She is represented in Sydney by Gallery Barry Keldoulis.

 


Joan Ross

Born 1961, Glasgow; lives and works in the Blue Mountains, NSW.

Joan Ross’ works have been described as ‘packing a punch’ and are delivered with great lashings of humour, wit and irony. In recent video animations and prints, Joan reconfigures the colonial Australian landscape, drawing specific attention to history, memory and the absurd. A vital element of Ross’ work is to navigate the viewer through discomforting themes, encouraging us to rethink the impact of colonisation, imperialism, racism, consumerism and our ‘disposable’ culture.

Ross has work held in major private collections in Australia, China and Britain, as well as corporate and public collections including National Gallery of Australia, Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, Gold Coast Regional Gallery, Newcastle Region Art Gallery, Campbelltown Arts Centre, Artbank, University of Sydney, Wollongong University Art Collection, Macquarie Group Collection and City of Sydney. Ross featured in the ABC/BBC television series on Australian art with Edmund Capon which coincided with the Royal Academy of Arts Australia exhibition.

I’m really interested in history and the re-telling of history and all the lies and bias and projection that history is. I think my interest in history stems from my real interest in nature. And my interest in what being civilised is. What underlies almost all of my work is nature; about being natural and what a constructed civilisation is.
- Joan Ross, Artist Profile, Issue 08, 2009, pp 40-41

 


John Tonkin

Born 1963, Adelaide. Lives and works in Sydney.

John Tonkin is both a scientist and an artist. In the early eighties, after studying biological sciences, he began experimenting with film, video and animation. His work explores interactivity as a site for physical and mental play. Recent projects have used real-time 3d animation, visualisation and data-mapping technologies and custom built and programmed electronics. His works have often involved building frameworks / tools / toys within which the artwork is formed through the accumulated interactions of its users. His current research is around cybernetics, embodied cognition and situated perception.

In 1999-2000 John received a fellowship from the Australia Council’s New Media Arts Board. Major exhibitions have included 2nd International Media Art Biennale, Seoul Museum of Art, South Korea (2002), Centre Pompidou, Paris (2003), Museum of Contemporary Art, Taipei (2004), Wood Street Galleries, Pittsburgh (2007), Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2008), Performance Space, Sydney (2010) and International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), Istanbul (2011). He has undertaken collaborative projects at Artspace, Sydney (2005), and International Symposium on Electronic Art, San Jose (2006).

 


Kim Mahood

Kim Mahood is a writer and artist based near Canberra. She grew up in Central Australia and on Tanami Downs Station, and has maintained strong connections with the Aboriginal traditional owners and the families of the stockmen who worked with her family. She visits the Tanami every year, working on art and mapping projects with the Aboriginal custodians. Her memoir Craft for a Dry Lake won The Age Book of the Year for non-fiction and the NSW Premier’s Award. She has published essays in the Griffith Review, Meanjin and Best Australian Essays. Her artworks are held in state, territory and regional collections. Her latest book, Position Doubtful, will be published by Scribe in August.

 


Kirsten Thorpe

Kirsten Thorpe’s professional and research interests relate to the return of archival sources of material to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and the opportunities that the digital domain presents for communities to be actively involved in managing their cultural heritage resources. Prior to joining the State Library of NSW, Kirsten has worked with archival collections at the State archives of NSW and with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Data Archive (ATSIDA) University of Technology, Sydney. She is a descendant of the Worimi people of Port Stephens NSW and of the Manton, Feeney and Newlin families. Kirsten is a professional member of the Australian Society of Archivists (ASA), and current Convenor of the ASA Indigenous Issues Special Interest Group. Kirsten also sits on the National State Libraries of Australasia (NSLA) Indigenous Working Group. Both groups aim to bring discussion on Indigenous perspectives in Libraries and Archives.

 


Lottie Consalvo

Lottie Consalvo's practice traverses performance, video, photography, installation, painting and sculpture; she explores emotional and psychological conditions. Created from fragments of the everyday and fractures from significant life events, her work deals with tragedy and longing. In her long durational and endurance based performances, Lottie endures discomfort both physically and psychologically. She re-lives past events where audience often witnesses her undergoing a psychological change in real time.

Consalvo's most recent live performances at Alaska Projects, Tiny Stadiums Live Art Festival, The Lock-Up, Newcastle, and Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery. These works have positioned her in seemingly comfortable domestic environments almost still or moving occasionally, however often slumped and in discomfort. In her performances, tragedy, desire and longing are all present. Consalvo also makes what she calls 'life performances'. Her most recent being Compartmentalise 2013-2014, a year-long performance where the artist lived with minimal possessions in an attempt to gain psychological control after a significant life shift.

The engagement in conversations with Abramović about the processing of ideas, performance in everyday life and the documentation of temporal work are key hopes for Lottie throughout the residency program. The opportunity to undertake the Abramović method will impact on Lottie's habitual life that will ultimately become her work. Spending time in conversation with the other artists in the residency, individuals working on the project and those who are part of the public program are also great prospects for her time at the Pier.

Above right: Lottie Consalvo, It's too early to love you: music torture piece, 2014. Photo: Courtesy the artist

Natalie Abbott

Natalie Abbott creates sensory performance experiences. She is committed to the idea that everything is choreography, including light, sound, movement and design, and she utilises this vision when devising work. Abbott has been making her own work; touring throughout Europe, Asia and America; and working with independent choreographers and visual artists in Melbourne, the United Kingdom and New York. Natalie is a collaborator for the DEEP SOULFUL SWEATS (fantasy light yoga project) at CHUNKY MOVE, and has recently been invited to FOLA and Next Wave Festival opening party, 2014. She recently spoke alongside Stelarc on a panel ART and the BODY at the Wheeler Centre for Ideas for the Festival of Live Art in Melbourne.

Natalie aims to work through the concept of failure throughout the residency, using repetitive movement and vocal exercises to investigate a new physicality reached through exhaustion. She is intrigued by moments where failure generates honest problem solving within a performance, generating a kind of ‘authenticity’. Natalie is also interested in experimenting with the relationship between light and sound through choreography in the absence of the performer throughout the program.

Above right: Natalie Abbott, MAXIMUM, 2014. Photo: Gregory Lorenzutti

 

 


Nicola Gunn

Nicola Gunn is a first-person artist. She directs herself, performs herself and reveals herself. Sometimes she even tells the truth. As a performance maker she finds parallels between personal experiences and larger social realities; her work uses subversive humour to reflect on and respond to contemporary culture, people and places. She uses a multi-disciplinary approach to explore modes of performance and often makes work consistent with post-modern types of metafiction – works that put or display the idea of 'truth in fiction’ and ‘fiction in truth.’ To do this, her work tries to be open-ended using non-linear narratives and the juxtaposition of different genres and artforms to show continual slippages of self. Gunn’s artistic practice is committed to institutional critique, social engagement and generating works that activate the public sphere by questioning old ways of being or proposing new ones. She critically reflects on the role of performance in theatres, to examine power relations in existing organisations and to consider the relevance and social function of art itself.

Gunn’s work has been presented at the Melbourne Festival, Brisbane Festival, Melbourne Theatre Company NEON Festival, Dublin Theatre Festival, Festival de Keuze (Rotterdam, NL), Vitalstatistix, Theatre Works, and – with choreographer Jo Lloyd – at the NGV, Gertrude Contemporary and West Space amongst others. She has received commissions from Theatre Works, Malthouse Theatre and Performing Lines/Mobile States. In 2013 Gunn was the recipient of an Australia Council Creative Australia Fellowship.

Feeling that success might dull the critical edge of her work, Gunn will be using this residency to begin producing private performances for herself and eventually, for smaller audiences. These untitled and intimate experiments will range from small-scale excavations of everyday behaviour to large-scale happenings and all-night parties. If conceptual art proclaims that the idea for a work is more important than its execution, Gunn asks if a conceptual performance needs to be performed at all or if the thought behind it needs to be articulated? In other words, what happens when the artist stops doing anything.

 Above right: Nicola Gunn, Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster. Photo: Sarah Walker

 



Oliver Costello

Oliver Costello is from Bundjalung country, Northern Rivers of NSW. Oliver initiated and continues to lead the original Firesticks initiative in collaboration with Mulong - Traditional Knowledge Revival Pathways, Kuku Thaypan Fire Management Research Project, Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning (UTS) and the UTS Faculty of Design. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Adult Education and Community Management at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Combining a broad range of experiences in Indigenous Natural Cultural Resource management and Indigenous governance, Oliver works with Firesticks projects as a consulting advisor and at the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service as project officer in Aboriginal Heritage and Joint Management. Working with many communities, organisations and stakeholders, Oliver engages and develops a range of collaborative projects with the approach to support Indigenous leadership through community mentorship on country.

 


Patricia Piccininni

Born 1965, Freetown, Sierra Leone, lives and works in Melbourne.

Patricia Piccinini arrived in Australia in 1972 with her family, and completed a degree in economic history before studying painting at the Victorian College of the Arts. She works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, video, sound, installation and digital prints, often collaborating with specialists in industrial manufacture. Her work explores the ambiguous boundaries between the artificial and the natural, and the intimate and often uneasy relationship between the human body and scientific developments such as genetic engineering and biotechnology.

I think if people are disturbed by my work it is because it asks questions about fundamental aspects of our existence - about our artificiality, about our animalness, about our responsibilities towards our creations, our children and our environment - and these questions should be easy to answer but they are not. What I love is when people argue over what the work is trying to say, when they begin the process of examining the issues from a number of perspectives. I love watching a person move from an initial sense of revulsion against the strangeness of my creations towards a sense of understanding or sympathy. I love it when people realise that all this stuff is actually about our lives today.
- Patricia Piccinini

Piccinini has exhibited widely in Australia, staging solos shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, and has featured in numerous international exhibitions such as Berlin Biennale (2001), Liverpool Biennale (2002), Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2003), Taipei Biennale (2009), Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo (2011), Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2012). She represented Australia at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003). In 2013, she presented Skywhale as a major commission for the Centenary of Canberra, Australia. Patricia Piccinini is represented in Sydney by Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

 


Ronald Briggs

Ronald Briggs is an Indigenous Services Librarian at the State Library of NSW. Briggs is a Gamilaroi man originally from Moree in central north-western NSW. Trained as a schoolteacher before beginning work as Indigenous Services Librarian at the State Library of New South Wales since 1991, Ronald is a keen family historian and has also worked with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Briggs sits on a number of boards and has co-curated Carved trees : Aboriginal cultures of western NSW in 2011 and Freedom Ride ’65 in 2015.

 


Russell Smith

Ngarrinderi actor Russell Smith graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Arts (NIDA) and has over a decade of professional experience in the entertainment industry. He has taught at a number of leading institutes, and is currently the course manager of Children and Young People at NIDA.

 


Sarah Rodigari

Sarah Rodigari creates performances that address economies of exchange pertaining to socio-political engagement, shared authorship and new institutional critique. Working at the intersections of theatre, visual art and social practice her method is responsive and context specific. Recent projects take the form of lecture, text, video, collaboration and curation.

Rodigari has presented work at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia, Melbourne International Arts Festival, South Project (Indonesia), PACT Zollverein (Germany), Centre for Contemporary Art Glasgow, The National Review of Live Art (UK), Anti-Contemporary Arts Festival (Finland), and SOMA (Mexico City). Sarah has a BA (Hons) in Sociology (UNSW), a Masters in Fine Art (RMIT) and is currently a PhD candidate in Creative Art at the University of Wollongong. She recently published a chapter on performance art, and sympathetic magic for the publication Travel and Transformation and co-edited the book Going Down, an anthology of contemporary Sydney performance. Rodigari is a founding member of the collective Field Theory; who make and support art projects that cross disciplines, shift contexts and seek new strategies for intervening in the public sphere.

Rodigari’s approach to making work includes responding to the project brief in the site where the work is presented. In short this means she won’t know what will happen until she arrives at Pier 2/3. The artwork will be realised in the process of its making, live in the present moment and in relation to the viewer.

Above right: Sarah Rodigari. Photo courtesy the artist.

Sarah-Jane Norman

Sarah-Jane Norman is an Australian artist and writer of British and Indigenous Australian heritage with ties to both Wannarua and Wiradjuri Nations, currently working between Australia, Germany and the United Kingdom. Trained originally in devised theatre and movement practices, her work traverses performance, installation, sculpture, video, text and sound. Norman's primary medium is the body: the body as a spectacle of truth and a theatre of fantasy; a siphon of personal and collective memory; an organism with which we are infinitely familiar and eternally estranged; a site which is equally loaded and empty of meaning, where histories, narratives, desires and discourses converge and collapse.

Her work has been presented widely, including Venice International Performance Week (IT), Spill Festival of Live Art (UK), Fierce Festival (UK), In Between Time (UK), Arnolfini (UK), Performance Space (AU), Next Wave (AU), the Australian Experimental Art Foundation (AU), Edinburgh Festival (UK) and Brisbane International Festival (AU).

Right: Sarah-Jane Norman, Corpus Nullius/Blood Country, Unsettling Suite, 2013. Photo: Courtesy the artist

 

 



Shaun Gladwell

Born 1972, Sydney. Lives and works in London, UK.


Shaun Gladwell finds poetry in popular culture. He is often the subject and the director or maker of his own work. The actors or subjects in his videos include skateboard riders, break dancers, bike riders and martial artists. Gladwell’s videos focus on the beauty of their extraordinary physical strength and on the skill and grace of the visual tricks they perform. Using devices such as slow motion and long takes, he enhances the poetry of each movement, intensifying our appreciation of urban life.

I really enjoy playing different positions in the production of art: either performing or being behind the camera, or studying someone else’s performance, so it’s not all about my performance. It’s also about trying to analyse the world in which other performers participate.
- Shaun Gladwell, quoted by Rosemary Sorenson in ‘Striving for Maximus effect’, The Australian, May 30, 2008

Gladwell has undertaken numerous international residencies and commissions, and exhibited extensively throughout Europe, North and South America, and the Asia Pacific Region. He represented Australia at the 53rd Venice Biennale and travelled to Afghanistan as the official Australian War Artist in 2009. Gladwell’s work is held in major public and private collections nationally and internationally, including Wadsworth Atheneum, USA; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; the Progressive Art Collection, USA and National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. In 2014, he presented a solo survey show at University of NSW Galleries. He is represented in Sydney and Melbourne by Anna Schwartz Gallery.

 


Shaun Gladwell

Born 1972, Sydney, lives and works in London, UK.

Shaun Gladwell finds poetry in popular culture. He is often the subject and the director or maker of his own work. The actors or subjects in his videos include skateboard riders, break dancers, bike riders and martial artists. Gladwell’s videos focus on the beauty of their extraordinary physical strength and on the skill and grace of the visual tricks they perform. He uses devices such as slow motion and long takes to enhance the poetry of each movement and in the process, intensifies our appreciation of urban life.

Gladwell has undertaken numerous international residencies and commissions, and exhibited extensively throughout Europe, North and South America, and the Asia Pacific Region. He represented Australia at the 53rd Venice Biennale and travelled to Afghanistan as the official Australian War Artist in 2009. Gladwell’s work is held in major public and private collections nationally and internationally, including Wadsworth Atheneum, USA; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; the Progressive Art Collection, USA; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. In 2015, Gladwell was the subject of a survey exhibition at University of NSW Galleries.

I really enjoy playing different positions in the production of art: either performing or being behind the camera, or studying someone else’s performance, so it’s not all about my performance. It’s also about trying to analyse the world in which other performers participate.
- Shaun Gladwell, quoted by Rosemary Sorenson in ‘Striving for Maximus effect’, The Australian, May 30, 2008

 


The Kingpins

Angelica Mesiti, born 1976; Técha Noble, born 1977; Emma Price, born 1975; Katie Price, born 1978.

Forming in 2000 to participate in a nightclub drag-king competition (winning the title!), the Kingpins are a collective of four women whose shared process of practice is articulated through a series of critiques and drag actions. These provide a reflective - sometimes humorous, other times horrific - discourse between the construct of identity and its surrounding landscape of the political and the poetic. Performance, video and installation are combined with photography, fashion, graphic and sound design to bring to life the concentrated observations of four cinephiles, activists, musicologists, image junkies and dreamers.

We are a monster with four heads with an ever-growing number of sites and tentacles. Our work is about women and the possibilities of expression. We have a high level of respect, nostalgia and affection for all of those teenage icons from Madonna to Metallica. Heavy Metal for us especially has an intoxicating raw energy.

The Kingpins

The Kingpins have participated in exhibitions and performances at Gwangju Biennale (2004), Taipei Biennial (2004), Art Gallery of New South Wales (2005), Liverpool Biennale (2006), Nuit blanche, Paris (2006), Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris (2007), Fiac Art Fair, Paris (2007), Frieze Art Fair, London (2007) and Art Basel, Miami (2008). In 2013, the Kingpins were commissioned to create online video artwork for the Artbank collection. Their work is held in the collections of Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Tasmanian Art Gallery, and in private collections in Australia, Asia and Europe.

 


Todd McMillan

Born 1979, Sydney. Lives and works in Sydney.

Todd McMillan’s work draws its inspiration from the history of Romanticism in Western art. His videos combine humour and pathos with references to images from art history, to pop music and to Hollywood cinema. In I love you I want you I need you (2007), McMillan confronts the short, potentially devastating, moment of telling someone you love them. The video shows a young man (the artist), exhausted and almost in pain as he slowly and deliberately says, “I love you, I want you, I need you” – a line taken from an Elvis Presley song. According to McMillan, love requires endurance, dedication and obsession and so does the making of art.

We are led to question what becomes of real emotion, of loving, wanting and needing, when their delivery is so explicitly arduous? Although the sentiment of these words seems to have been eroded, both through over-use and McMillan’s stark and faltering delivery, perhaps his physical discomfort reinvests them with the genuine earnestness and meaning they often lack.
- Todd McMillan, 2007

McMillan has exhibited widely across Australia and internationally at museums and galleries such as Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; Supermarket 2010, Stockholm and Orange Regional Gallery. In 2013, he was the subject of a survey exhibition at the Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart. McMillan was awarded the Helen Lemprière Travelling Art Scholarship in 2006. His work is held by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, and in private collections around Australia. He is represented by Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney.

 


Tracey Moffatt

Born 1960, Brisbane, lives and works in New York, USA.

Tracey Moffatt is a leading contemporary visual artist who works in photography, film and video. Some of Moffatt’s photographs and short films have achieved iconic status in her home country of Australia and Internationally. Born in Brisbane in 1960, Moffatt studied visual communications at the Queensland College of Art, from which she graduated in 1982. Since her first solo exhibition at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney in 1989, she has exhibited extensively in museums all over the world. Her photographs play with many different printing processes and have a filmic, narrative quality. Tracey Moffat, a powerful visual storyteller, approaches all her work in the media of photography and video as a film director.

I love how Martin Scorsese constantly references other film directors and films. You see him in interviews revelling in his love and knowledge of cinema. Then you look at his films and see the power and originality. I also like to do my homework, though it is never work, I should just call it “joy”. Sometimes it’s all I ever do, I’m constantly in a bookshop or chasing some obscure film.
- Tracey Moffatt in a letter to Lynne Cooke, former curator, Dia Center for the Arts, New York, 1997

Solo exhibitions of Moffatt's work have been organised throughout Australia and internationally, at prestigious venues such as Dia Art Foundation, New York (1997), Kunsthalle Vienna (1998), Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1999), Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2003–04), Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (2005), Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012) and Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2014). Her works have been included in important group exhibitions, such as the Biennale of Sydney (1993, 2000, and 2008), Venice Biennale (1997), São Paulo Bienal (1996 and 1998), Prague Biennale (2005), Family Pictures at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York (2007) and the Liverpool Biennial (2008). In 2007 she was awarded the Infinity Award for Excellence in Photography by the International Center for Photography in New York. Tracey Moffatt is represented in Sydney by Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

 


TV Moore

Born 1974, Canberra, lives and works in New York, USA.

TV Moore works with film, video and theatrics. His practice engages in a variety of material influenced by the conventions found in cinema, television, experimental and underground film world and theatre. TV Moore is also a musician and his works often use a musical soundtrack composed and performed by Moore himself.

Magick Without Tears is a project that speaks of the very structure of video editing and manipulation. Continuing my interest in the outsider and the fusion of the real with the unreal, I chose the symbol of a clown as a stand-in for a quiet discontent that represents the undercurrent of societal anarchism.
- TV Moore

Moore has participated in numerous national and international exhibitions at museums and galleries such as Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2001, 2005, 2009, 2011, 2012), Iaspis, Stockholm (2004), Contemporary Art Space, Osaka (2005), Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius (2004), Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw (2006), Turin Triennale (2005), Cockatoo Island, Sydney (2011-ongoing) and Biennale of Sydney (2008, 2014). In 2014, he presented a solo survey show at Campbelltown Arts Centre. He is a recipient of the Sally and Don Lucas Artist Fellowship, USA, and Samstag International Art Scholarship. TV Moore is represented in Sydney by Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

 


zin

(Harriet Gillies & Roslyn Helper)

zin is the artist partnership of Harriet Gillies and Roslyn Helper. Formed in 2011, zin's work focuses on the power of experience by combining immersive, visceral and hybrid-art elements. Through their work they are interested in developing methodologies and concepts that deal with the public sphere, immaterial performance modes, large-scale execution, site specificity, audience immersion and activation. zin continuously redefine the audience-artist relationship by creating generative environments that encourage new ways of thinking and interacting.

zin have presented work at PACT (I’ll Have What She’s Having, 2015), Firstdraft (Karaoke For Wankers, 2015), Sydney Festival's Parramatta Opening Night Party (Take A Shot, 2014), the Festival of Live Art in Melbourne (Make The Call, 2014), Underbelly Arts Lab and Festival (zin’s Party Mode, 2013), City of Darwin's National Youth Week Festival (Make The Call, 2013) and Tiny Stadiums Festival (The Dictator’s Ball, 2013). zin received a JUMP mentorship grant from the Australia Council in 2013 and have participated in residencies and programs across Australia. Gillies attained a Graduate Diploma of Performing Arts (Directing) at NIDA and Helper completed her Masters in Arts Politics at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.

This residency is an exciting opportunity for the duo to develop new creative risks by pushing aesthetic and conceptual boundaries. Under the guidance of Marina Abramović, zin will use the residency as a space to enact heightened levels of bravery in performance both for themselves and audiences. zin's aims for the residency also extend to developing their language for performative communication with fellow resident artists through exercises in duration and presence. zin hope to find new ways of communicating with each other, with other artists and with audiences.

Above right: zin, The OAFFICE, The Cube, Oxford Arts Factory, 2013. Photo: Courtesy the artist

 


The Residency Program

The Residency Program

'Prosumer'

'Prosumer'

Radical Vulnerability

As a performer I owe a debt to Abramovic and other artists of her generation as pioneers of the form. "pioneer" is a difficult word: when we use it we run the risk of neutering an artist by historicising them. But the fact remains: i deeply respect Abramović as a pathfinder and an Elder. I likewise respect her as a woman artist who has continually affronted a phallocentric art world, and I respect her as an artist working in a non-material and temporal form, in a field dominated by the capital value of objects.

Abramović's work posesses a conceptual clarity and urgency which inspires me deeply. Likewise, her investment in risk, and in radical vulnerability. This language of risk that we work with as performers: Abramović was among the first crop of artists to rigorously embrace that language and push its limits. Abramović is a force of nature: none of her work is simple. I don't like all of it. For that fact alone I hugely value her practice, because I'm not interested in liking things. I'm interested in being moved. All of Abramovic's work moves me to something. None of it is easy but all of it is powerful. 

- Sarah-Jane Norman

 


Radical Vulnerability

10 minute reflection


Wednesday July 1

Walking too fast in a ‘go slow zone’.

Only activating the space with my presence and commitment, with nothing to show for it. I feel like I am always getting into trouble. Cannot please those who are asking things of me.

I love my new friends.

 

- Sarah Rodigari



10 minute reflection

10 minute reflection


Thursday July 2

Our days are so full. Mike Parr, Jill Orr, Nicola Gunn, I notice that “performance artist” in Australia favour the ‘rr’ - lion like. I have two ‘i’s in my name.

Downstairs you can slow down. Through doing as little as possible - something happen: it’s the journey versus the end point etc. I notice that those who spend time in the space enjoy their experience much more than those who pass through it quickly(lol an obvious observation). Life favours you when you are present, that mindfulness kind of thing.

Upstairs - is about doing things - activating the space, although to be clear, there is no expected outcome. Since I arrived I have produced the following:

A two - hour public program

Two installations, connecting my sleeping cabin with the larger residency space.

A three - hour open mike talk fest with Christian Thompson.

A one - open mike talk fest with Marina, ‘doing nothing until something happens’ as she called it (the same could be said of all my work I think to myself).

I have met and spoken to around 100 people, perhaps you were one of these people? In these conversations we share our experiences. I feel vulnerable: I think you are too? How often do we share our thoughts with random strangers? This discomfort is a mild pleasure.

Today I am attempting to hire an actor to sing, dance and be ‘present’ on my behalf. Sometimes making art is boring, it involves sitting quietly, looking deeply into colours and or other such things.

 

- Sarah Rodigari



10 minute reflection

10 minute reflection


Monday June 29


It is 7 degrees this morning and hard to type.

I am not going to warm up with a run (a fast waddle along the quay to the opera house steps).

I won’t walk across the pier to have a shower at Sydney Dance Company.

“Did you have a good shower?” I asked.

She replied with a blank stare: of course.

I know those taps where the water runs hot then cold, then hot, then cold and then hot and cold again. Some would say that this is good for the body and the mind. It tightens and releases your muscles and wakes you up. Today I want to be cared for not woken up.

Also, sometimes it is hard to shower with ballerinas’ when you’re not one yourself.

- Sarah Rodigari

 



10 minute reflection

10 minute reflection


Friday 3 July, 2015

A guy walks into a residency, takes a photo and then leaves.

You’re welcome. Thank you celebrity.

Mariana has a T-shirt that says “no selfies, just talk”. Now people take photos with her in this t-shirt.

Artist in Residency (AIR).

Everything is going wrong.

I forgot my hairbrush.

I bought an app for an artwork. It won’t arrive till next week, too late. I called to ask if I could download it. “No” they said.

I tried to take myself out to dinner but they didn’t have a table for one.

Despite wearing shoes in the shower, despite it being cold, for the first time in my life I think I have developed Athletes foot. In light of my current situation I am seeing this as an achievement.

Does documentation make the art?

Last night I went to the free the arts forum at ATYP. I tried to wink at a friend but it accidentally caught the eye of another. “Sorry” I said,

My apology offended her. I go back to my cabin, the only place I know.

My cabin: my cubicle, my cell, my pod, my Virginia Woolf. I’ve never even read that book.

I’ve lost perspective of myself. I have lost confidence in myself.

There is a lot of talk about the relationship between art and failure.

Q: Why is failure such a big deal?

A: Because it feels bad?

If one could be bothered one could draw a parallel here between the rice and lentil exercise in Marina’s methodology downstairs. By setting the parameters before you start you manage expectations and avoid this feeling of failure.

Q: What are my parameters?

A: A curtain and a time frame.

My friend sends me a picture of Susan Sontag. It’s black and white, she’s youngish, I think, and lies on her back with her hands behind her head.

“ In this image…papers, endless drafts are strewn about Sontag like a fan. Facing my memory is strange. Editing confusing.” They say.

Here’s a joke.

Q: How long does it take to make a cup of tea?

A: It depends on the performance artist.

 

- Sarah Rodigari

10 minute reflection

10 minute reflection


Tuesday July 30

Continental breakfasts are always cold. Is this a fact? I cannot get the Internet today.

No matter how nice a continental breakfast is; in an old pier, where it is always colder inside than out, a continental breakfast never seems satisfying or even comforting. Not that food needs to always be comforting, but warm food is nice.

Everyday I notice myself eating because I am cold, not because I am hungry. Despite the food being good, I am never satisfied.

I am sneezing a lot.

- Sarah Rodigari

 



10 minute reflection

Expectations

My approach to making work includes responding to the project brief in the site where the work is presented. In short this means I won’t know what will happen until I arrive at Pier 2-3. The artwork will only be realised in the process of its making, live in the present moment and in relation to you, the viewer.

My methodology will include: no artifice, or promise of enlightenment, or tricks, or entrances, or exits or asides. There are no margins. I will not be pulling the wool over your eyes. There will be no monologues. I will not ask you to be on my side, or invite you to conspire and nor will you be an eyewitness to an event.

What is at stake between us? Perhaps we all want to participate and at the same time be left alone and because we cannot have both, we are always in conflict.

The public nature of this project implies a certain interruption. Participating in this project implies a detour. It seems to me that the best way to encounter the practice of performance is by immersing oneself further into the performance so that we reach a limit at which point something like an encounter beyond our control can happen. I invite you to be a part of this. This is the content of my work. This encounter may be addressed though the mechanism of a joke, a punch line built into the structure of our relationship, in which we encounter a limit that disorients us moving us to view things differently and hopefully with some humour.

Addressing the notion of limits, this project will be unavoidably difficult. I want to engaged directly with what is at stake in this immediacy: that is the relationship between us you (the viewer) and me (the artist) in the live encounter of this residency.

- Sarah Rodigari

Expectations

Participation

Participation